Arts are the lifeblood of our neighborhoods and our city

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Institutions such as the Korean Music Foundation, Lula Washington Dance Theatre, Art + Practice, L.A. Commons and many, many others nourish the spirit of our community.

Amazing Grace Conservatory
Amazing Grace Conservatory

The arts also power a creative economy that supports our families and neighborhoods and whose importance can’t be overstated. They are core economic assets and a key consideration when we speak broadly of economic development, education, social justice, community development and even public health. Art heals.

Throughout his career, Mark Ridley-Thomas has provided critical funding and support for our community’s grassroots arts organizations: When the Los Angeles County Arts Internship Program was in jeopardy, he worked with arts organizations and nonprofits to see that not only did it survive, but thrive. Today, the internship program has evolved, adapting to the needs of our college students and arts organizations. Students are provided with much-needed financial support, and arts organizations gain access to an engaged and motivated pool of talent.

Lula Washington Dance
Lula Washington Dance

Because funding is always an issue for artists, MRT also led the effort to institutionalize government support for our creative community by establishing the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture. The Department issues grants to dozens of nonprofit organizations, many of which use arts to deliver mental health, homeless prevention, community re-entry and other vital human services.

In the 10th District, art is everywhere. The Vision Theater, the Ray Charles Memorial Library, the Nate Holden Performing Arts Theater and the Underground Museum are just some of the resources of which our district can be proud.

In short, the 10th District is home to some of the city’s most innovative and influential arts organizations and leaders. MRT’s support for them has been, is, and will continue to be enthusiastic and ongoing.